Can you get hidden channels with your antenna?

The answer to this question is probably yes. However, you may need help from an expert installer to choose the correct type of aerial for your location and the channels you want to access.

Can you get hidden channels with your antenna

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Some people are able to access extra channels using just an indoor aerial, but this is only likely to apply if you live in an area with a very strong signal, such as a large city. Most people will get much better results using an outdoor antenna.

The channels that you can get will depend to some extent on three factors. The first is size – the antennas come in different sizes. The second is directionality. This means that while some antennas can receive signals from any direction, others need to be pointed towards an incoming signal. The final factor is amplification. Most antennas are not amplified, that is, the signal is not electronically boosted.

Your installer needs local knowledge

In Calne TV aerial repair experts, Steve Unett Aerials (http://steveunettaerials.co.uk/services/tv-aerials-repair-installation-calne/) can take a look at your current installation and advise on whether you’ll be able to get the signals you need to view hidden channels.

This is why it’s important to use an installer who not only understands the channel possibilities that exist but also has a good knowledge of the local area and the kind of signals that are available in various locations, including any “dead spots”.

Hidden channels will increase in future

In the US, 150 sub channels are available to people with an antenna. It’s a trend that is building here. To access the channels, you need to scan for new stations. Remember too, that some video streaming sticks, such as the Roku, have both a public channel store and a “hidden” store, as the tech know-how site PocketLint has reported.

Many of the TV channels that you can pick up via your antenna are specialist broadcasters. For example, you may have a great local TV channel, and let’s face it, many of the so-called “regional’ segments on BBC and ITV cover such a huge area that local areas rarely feature. What we’re beginning to see is the development of community-based TV broadcasting to very specific locations. Similarly, these hidden TV channels often cater to particular cultures or languages or very specific interests and hobbies.

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