The martini is one of the most famous cocktails in the world – but that isn’t all it has to offer. It’s also one of the most simple cocktails, requiring less than three ingredients, but there are still hundreds of different variations of the martini cocktail, including sweet versions, fruity versions and versions that don’t use vermouth.

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But what if you don’t want a fancy new version? What if you just want the classic, perfect martini? If so, we’ve got your back: here’s how to make the perfect martini.

How to make the perfect martini

Chilled martini gasses
A metal shaker
Your garnish of choice; the most popular options are a slice of lemon peel or an olive

These are all the ingredients that you will need to make the cocktail, which was invented sometime during the 1870s. You can also pick up a classic martini cocktail at the F1 Paddock Club; visit to find out more about booking a space.

How to make the martini

Take the vermouth out of the fridge and pour the spirit into the cap (everything that you need should be kept in the fridge or freezer for a few hours beforehand).

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Take the metal shaker out of the freezer, and put ice cubes inside, and then pour in the vermouth.

Swirl the ice and the vermouth around, and then take the gin out of the freezer, and add three ounces of the gin to the shaker.

Swirl the mix around, and then put the mixer down. Leave the drink to sit for a minute, and then swirl it again.

Once you have done this you can take your garnish out of the fridge and put it on a toothpick. If you decide to use olives, take two and push the red pimento out of the middle, and then push the two olives onto one toothpick.

Swirl the drink one more time and then strain the mix into two cocktail glasses.

This delicious cocktail is very simple to make, but it is important to let the drink settle for a minute before you pour it. This gives the gin a chance to properly mix with the vermouth and ice, creating a perfect smooth flavour – but make sure that you don’t swill the drinks too vigorously, as this can bruise the gin.